Six Most Expensive Lamborghinis in the World

Six Most Expensive Lamborghinis in the World

Some questions you don’t want the answer to because it can make you sad. Questions

Some questions you don’t want the answer to because it can make you sad. Questions like – how much is a Lamborghini?

The Italian brand builds some of the world’s most desirable and rarest sports cars – from its vintage Miura and Countach, to its latest model, the Huracan STO – but that means they don’t come cheap. 

In fact, the cheapest (and I use that word loosely) Lamborghini you can currently buy is the Huracan LP580-2, which has a starting price of $378,900, and that doesn’t include any customisation or options (both of which are popular on any new model) and on-road costs.

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At the other end of the range, the most expensive Lamborghini currently sold in Australia is the Aventador SVJ, a V12 hypercar with a price tag starting at $949,640 – so you’re spending at least $1m just to get it in traffic.

Of course, buying a Lambo does mean you’re buying more than a car. The brand with the rampaging bull badge is as much as image and lifestyle as it is about pure automotive performance.

Each of the Lamborghini models is an artwork on wheels, a blend of aerodynamics and design like few other brands offer. Put simply, Lamborghini makes cool cars, the types of cars that as a kid you’d put pictures of on your bedroom wall – truly aspirational creations.

In recent years, since its takeover by Audi and the wider Volkswagen Group, the Italian company has learnt to cash-in on its desirability and the demand from clients for something even more special than a million dollar supercar. 

That’s why we’ve seen the creation of limited run models like the revived, Aventador-based Countach, Reventón, Veneno, Egoista and Centenario – to name a few.

And naturally, with these increasingly special and rare models prices have gone up, too, hitting new heights for Lamborghini.

What is the most expensive Lamborghini?

Based on the Aventador LP700-4, the Veneno got a completely new body.

Before we answer this question we must add a caveat – this is the most expensive publicly listed sale. As will become clear, the most affluent Lamborghini owners operate in a different space to most car consumers, so private sales for huge sums are highly likely. Having said that…

The most expensive Lamborghini confirmed sale that is public knowledge was the 2019 auction of a white 2014 Veneno Roadster. Not only does it cost a lot of money, but it comes with a colourful history, too.

The white and beige roofless hypercar was owned by Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, vice president of Equatorial Guinea and son of the country’s authoritarian president, Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo. 

The car was reportedly one of 11 supercars seized by Swiss authorities in 2016 when it accused Mangue of money laundering.

What is the average price of a Lamborghini? 

The Huracan replaced the Gallardo in 2014. (image credit: Mitchell Tulk) The Huracan replaced the Gallardo in 2014. (image credit: Mitchell Tulk)

This is a bit like asking ‘what’s the average length of a piece of string?’ because Lamborghinis come in different shapes, sizes and vintages – all of which impact the cost.

Mathematically speaking the average cost based on the 12 models sold in Australia, the average price of a Lamborghini is $561,060.

However, if you look at the specific models you get a better indication, as the Huracan, Aventador and Urus are all positioned and priced differently. 

The five model Huracan coupe line-up has an average price of $469,241, which compares to the $854,694 average price for the three-tier Aventador range.

Why are Lamborghinis so expensive? What is considered expensive? 

the Aventador is named after a Spanish fighting bull that fought in Zaragoza, Aragón in 1993. (image credit: Mitchell Tulk) the Aventador is named after a Spanish fighting bull that fought in Zaragoza, Aragón in 1993. (image credit: Mitchell Tulk)

Exclusivity and attention-to-detail. From its earliest days Lamborghini has prioritised quality over quantity, selling fewer cars but at a higher price. That’s not unique to the brand, following the lead set by Ferrari and other sports car manufacturers.

The Italian brand has expanded under Audi’s leadership, most notably adding a smaller, more affordable V10-powered model underneath it’s V12-power flagship; first the Gallardo and now the Huracan. It also added the Urus SUV, a major departure for the brand but a move that has been a sales success.

Despite this growth Lamborghini still sells relatively few cars. It recorded its biggest sales results ever in 2021, but it was still only 8405 cars, a tiny fraction of mainstream brands like Toyota, Ford and Hyundai. 

As with anything in life, price is set by supply and demand, so by keeping supply low, demand (and prices) have remained high.

The other major factor on price is the customization and personalisation that Lamborghini allows its owners. Because each car is largely hand-made, owners are able to select a one of the 350 standard colours the company offers, or choose a bespoke exterior paint and/or interior trim as well as other special elements to make their car feel unique.

Top six most expensive Lamborghinis

1. 2014 Lamborghini Veneno Roadster – $11.7m

Unveiled at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, the Veneno celebrated Lamborghini's 50th anniversary. Unveiled at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, the Veneno celebrated Lamborghini’s 50th anniversary.

Putting aside its questionable ownership heritage – and dull colour scheme – there’s good reason why the Veneno Roadster tops this list. Based on the Aventador LP700-4, the Veneno got a completely new body with a much more aggressive design and a more powerful version of the 6.5-litre V12 engine.

Unveiled as a coupe at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show it was meant to be a concept car to celebrate the brand’s 50th anniversary. When potential owners started lining up, Lamborghini decided to make and sell just three coupes.

However, once it became clear that there was more demand than supply, Lamborghini decided to take the roof off to create the Veneno Roadster, producing nine production examples. Each reportedly had a starting price of $6.3m and each was finished in a different paint colour. 

This particular record-breaking example is finished in beige and white, complete with a beige and black interior. According to the listing, when it was sold in 2019 it had just 325km on the odometer and was still rolling on the same tyres it left the factory with. It even came with a matching car cover.

2. 2018 Lamborghini SC18 Alston – $9.8m

The Alston borrows elements from Squadra Corse’s Huracan GT3 and Huracan SuperTrofeo racing cars. The Alston borrows elements from Squadra Corse’s Huracan GT3 and Huracan SuperTrofeo racing cars.

Lamborghini began to take customer personalisations to the next level in the second-half of last decade and the SC18 Alston is arguably the most extreme example to-date; but surely won’t be the last.

The one-off car was built in collaboration between the owner (who’s identity remains a mystery) and Squadra Corse – Lamborghini’s in-house motor racing division. 

While based on the Aventador SVJ, the Alston borrows elements from Squadra Corse’s Huracan GT3 and Huracan SuperTrofeo racing cars, including the adjustable rear wing, roof-integrated air-intake and sculpted bonnet.

Lamborghini claimed the SC18 Alston’s 6.5-litre V12 was good for 565kW/720Nm, which must make it an exciting car to drive on the track – especially if you think about the price while you’re racing past concrete walls.

3. 1971 Lamborghini Miura SV Speciale – $6.1m

Sold at the 2020 Concours of Elegance at Hampton Court Palace, this Miura SV Speciale fetched a record price of £3.2m. Sold at the 2020 Concours of Elegance at Hampton Court Palace, this Miura SV Speciale fetched a record price of £3.2m.

Many will argue that the Miura is the most beautiful car ever made, let alone the best Lamborghini, and who are we to say otherwise. But it’s what lies beneath the surface of this 1971 built model that makes it so valuable.

Sold at the 2020 Concours of Elegance at Hampton Court Palace, this Miura SV Speciale fetched a record price for the classic V12 coupe at £3.2m. 

Why did it cost so much? Well, not only is it one of only 150 Miura SVs ever built, but this gold ‘Speciale’ is fitted with a dry sump lubrication system and limited-slip differential – making it one-of-a-kind.

And in the collectable car business, rarity typically translates to more value.

4. 2012 Lamborghini Sesto Elemento – $4.0m

The Sesto Elemento originally sold for $4m back in 2012. The Sesto Elemento originally sold for $4m back in 2012.

The Reventón was arguably the first limited edition model that demonstrated to Lamborghini the lucrative market there was for special creations. But it’s no surprise that it’s the Sesto Elemento that has generated high demand from collectors.

Originally the car sold for approximately $4m when it went on sale in 2012, but there have been unverified reports of the Sesto Elemento trading for more than $9m since. Not surprising given its unique design and Lamborghini’s decision to build only 20 examples.

Unlike the Reventón, Veneno, Sian and Countach, the Sesto Elemento was based on the Huracan, using its 5.2-litre V10 engine as the foundation of its design. 

The goal of the design team was to reduce weight – Sesto Elemento is a reference to the atomic number of carbon – so carbon-fibre was used extensively, not just for chassis and bodywork but also suspension pieces and the driveshaft. 

Lamborghini even invented a new type of material for the project, forged carbon fibre, which was easier and more flexible to work with. 

Such was the focus on weight reduction the Sesto Elemento doesn’t even have seats, instead owners were given custom-fit padding that was attached directly to the forged carbon fibre chassis.

5. 2020 Lamborghini Sian Roadster – $3.7m 

Lamborghini is only building 19 Sian roadsters. Lamborghini is only building 19 Sian roadsters.

As Lamborghini found new ways to reinvent the basic underpinnings of the Aventador into new and different models, pricing for each crept up, reaching its current peak with the Sian Roadster (and the $3.6m Sian FKP 37 Coupe).

Hailed as the brand’s first ‘super sports car’ with hybrid technology, the Sian (which means lightning in the company’s local language) pairs the long-serving V12 petrol engine with a 48-volt electric motor and supercapacitor for a performance boost. 

Lamborghini claimed this new powertrain is good for 602kW – 577kW from the V12 and 25kW coming from the electric motor that’s built into the gearbox.

It’s not just what’s underneath that’s new either. While it sits on the same platform as the Aventador, the Sian earns its unique name by having its own unique body. 

What’s more, Lamborghini is only building 82 examples of the car (63 coupes and 19 roadsters) and each one will be finished in a unique colour – so no two will be the same, thus increasing the value of each.

6. 2021 Lamborghini Countach LPI 800-4 – $3.2m

The 2022 Countach has a body heavily influenced by the ‘74 original. The 2022 Countach has a body heavily influenced by the ‘74 original.

Following the success of the Sian project (which was naturally a sell-out) Lamborghini continued its ‘limited series’ models in 2021 by reviving one of its most famous nameplates.

The original Countach was arguably the car that created the DNA of the Lamborghini brand, with its angular styling and V12 engine standing out boldly when it appeared in 1974. 

Now, more than four decades later the Countach name returned to help finish off the Aventador after it had served more than a decade on sale.

The Countach LPI 800-4 is, put simply, a Sian FKP 37 with a fresh look as it boasts the same V12 engine and supercapacitor-powered hybrid system. 

But the body is heavily influenced by the ‘74 original, with several similar styling elements including the large intakes on the sides and unique headlights and tail-lights.

Being what Lamborghini calls a ‘limited series’ model only 112 were built, so with demand out-stripping supply the price of this new Countach was reportedly set at $3.24m.